Learning Strategies For College and Career, Third Edition
Learning Strategies For College and Career, Third Edition

Learning Strategies For College and Career, Third Edition

Lead Author(s): Rebecca Campbell, Paul Hettich

Student Price: Contact us to learn more

Learning Strategies for College and Career, from BVT Publishing, is a concise yet comprehensive textbook with all of the content required to teach a typical College Success or FYE course. The unique model of student success can be used beyond the first year, across a student's entire academic education journey. This Top Hat version contains everything you need for before, during, and after class. Students can read fully customizable chapters with built-in active learning components and formative assessment elements. Each chapter is accompanied by PowerPoint slides with built-in comprehension questions and engagement tools. After class, students can engage with pre-made, fully customizable homework assignments, plus chapter summaries for student review. There is also a comprehensive chapter-by-chapter Instructor’s Manual; pre-made customizable midterm and final exams; and extensive test banks.

What is a Top Hat Textbook?

Top Hat has reimagined the textbook – one that is designed to improve student readership through interactivity, is updated by a community of collaborating professors with the newest information, and accessed online from anywhere, at anytime.


  • Top Hat Textbooks are built full of embedded videos, interactive timelines, charts, graphs, and video lessons from the authors themselves
  • High-quality and affordable, at a significant fraction in cost vs traditional publisher textbooks
 

Key features in this textbook

Self-Assessments: Being reflective is one of the qualities of a successful student, so many cues are provided to better understand current learning habits and behaviors
Built-in assessment questions embedded throughout chapters so students can read a little, do a little, and test themselves to see what they know
Full set of slide decks aligned to each chapter of the book; ready to use in class, with Top Hat questions

Comparison of Learning Strategies for College and Career textbooks

Consider adding Top Hat’s Learning Strategies for College and Career, 3rd edition, 2019,  to your upcoming course. We’ve put together a textbook comparison to make it easy for you in your upcoming evaluation.

Top Hat

Campbell and Hettich – Learning Strategies for College and Career (3rd ed.)

Cengage

Skip Downing – On Course: Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life (9th ed available February 2019)

Cengage

Dave Ellis –Becoming a Master Student (16th ed)  available on Cengage Unlimited

Pricing

Average price of textbook across most common format

Up to 40-60% more affordable

Lifetime access on any device

$60

E-book

$124.95

Print text only

$60

E-book full purchase. $24.49 for a rental.

$92.95

Print text only

In-Book Interactivity

Includes embedded multi-media files and integrated software to enhance visual presentation of concepts directly in textbook.

Customizable

Ability to revise, adjust and adapt content to meet needs of course and instructor

BUILT-IN INTERACTIVE ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

Assessment questions with feedback embedded throughout textbook

All-in-one Platform

Access to additional questions, test banks, and slides available within one platform

Pricing

Average price of textbook across most common format

Top Hat

Campbell and Hettich – Learning Strategies for College and Career (3rd ed.)

Up to 40-60% more affordable

Lifetime access on any device

Cengage

Skip Downing – On Course: Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life (9th ed available February 2019)

$60

E-book

$124.95

Print text only

Cengage

Dave Ellis –Becoming a Master Student (16th ed)  available on Cengage Unlimited

$60

E-book full purchase. $24.49 for a rental.

$92.95

Print text only

In-book Interactivity

Includes embedded multi-media files and integrated software to enhance visual presentation of concepts directly in textbook

Top Hat

Campbell and Hettich – Learning Strategies for College and Career (3rd ed.)

Cengage

Skip Downing – On Course: Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life (9th ed available February 2019)

Cengage

Dave Ellis –Becoming a Master Student (16th ed)  available on Cengage Unlimited

Customizable

Ability to revise, adjust and adapt content to meet needs of course and instructor

Top Hat

Campbell and Hettich – Learning Strategies for College and Career (3rd ed.)

Cengage

Skip Downing – On Course: Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life (9th ed available February 2019)

Cengage

Dave Ellis –Becoming a Master Student (16th ed)  available on Cengage Unlimited

Built-in Interactive Assessment Questions

Assessment questions with feedback embedded throughout textbook

Top Hat

Campbell and Hettich – Learning Strategies for College and Career (3rd ed.)

Cengage

Skip Downing – On Course: Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life (9th ed available February 2019)

Cengage

Dave Ellis –Becoming a Master Student (16th ed)  available on Cengage Unlimited

All-in-one Platform

Access to additional questions, test banks, and slides available within one platform

Top Hat

Campbell and Hettich – Learning Strategies for College and Career (3rd ed.)

Cengage

Skip Downing – On Course: Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life (9th ed available February 2019)

Cengage

Dave Ellis –Becoming a Master Student (16th ed)  available on Cengage Unlimited

About this textbook

Lead Author

Rebecca Campbell, PhDNorthern Arizona University

Rebecca Campbell, PhD, is a Professor of Educational Psychology at Northern Arizona University, where she teaches courses on the theory of teaching and learning for the Professional Education Programs. Generally, her work focuses on how pedagogy and academic policies can facilitate student success in higher education. Her research foci include looking at best practices in first-year seminar design, academic probation interventions, and gateway courses. Dr. Campbell has over 25 years of experience designing and implementing first-year seminars and student success course interventions at both the community college and university level. This text is the result of her experience working to facilitate the persistence and completion of thousands of students during her career in higher education.

Lead Author

Paul I. Hettich, PhDMarquette University

Paul I. Hettich, PhD, earned his degrees in psychology from Marquette University, New Mexico State University, and Loyola University Chicago. He served as an Army personnel psychologist, program evaluator in an education laboratory, and corporate applied research scientist—positions that created a “real-world” foundation for a 35-year career at Barat College (Illinois). In addition to full-time teaching, he chaired the psychology department, served as academic dean, and directed institutional research, grant writing, and community college articulation. Following DePaul University’s acquisition of Barat College, he continued to head the psychology program and retired from DePaul with the rank of Professor Emeritus. He has delivered numerous professional presentations and authored or coauthored several refereed publications, including three books and three book chapters.

Hettich’s earlier work in study skills has evolved into his current professional interest in college-to-workplace transition issues, including concepts reflected in this edition. Since the publication of Learning Skills for College and Career (2nd Ed.), several new developments have occurred in the student success field, including new research, an expansion of concepts, and new instructional delivery approaches. Thus, he is pleased to have partnered in the production of this edition with Professor Rebecca Campbell, a highly experienced, dedicated, and active professional in this field.

Explore this textbook

Read the fully unlocked textbook below, and if you’re interested in learning more, get in touch to see how you can use this textbook in your course today.

Chapter 1: Your College Journey

Chapter one of Learning Strategies for College and Career, third edition, by Campbell & Hettich, copyright BVT publishing.
“The only person who is educated is the person who has learned how to learn; the person who has learned how to adapt and change; the person who has realized that no knowledge is secure, that only the process of seeking knowledge gives a basis for security.”
— Adapted from Carl Rogers
“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”
— Nelson Mandela

Learning Goals

The goal of this chapter is to help you learn how to:

  1. Recognize the hallmarks of transition
  2. Manage expectations
  3. Understand the student success model and the principles for success

Preview

1.1 The Value of College
1.2 Beginning Your Journey

       1.2a The Transition to College
       1.2b Managing Your Expectations
               Give Yourself Time
               Apply Effort
               Expect Learning
               Define What You Want
1.3 Your Successful Journey
       1.3a A Model of Student Success
               Experiences
               Intentionality
               Seven Qualities of Successful Students (SQSS)
               Applying the Model
1.4 What Lies Ahead: An Overview
1.5 Connect to Campus
1.6 Connecting Student Success to Your Career
Closing Comments
Extend Your Experience

Introduction

Going to college is a big shift in your life. For most students, this shift includes the change from high school to a college campus, moving away from home, and managing your life more independently than before. If you’re a nontraditional student, shifting back into the classroom after time away can be equally unsettling. But you’ve chosen to enroll in college because you have set educational and career goals, and this is the first step in your journey. The college environment has a lot to offer you, and in turn, you have a lot to offer your college. Ultimately, you have enrolled in college with the goal of completing your certificate or degree in the next 2 to 4 years. You are anticipating that this experience will be a success.

To set you up for success, this chapter will examine three important aspects of the college experience: the value of a college experience, beginning your college journey, and creating the foundation for your journey to be successful.

begin content for self assessment

Self-Assessment 1.1: Have You Developed the Qualities of a Successful Student?

Self-Assessment 1.1

Record your scores for each of the seven sections. In which areas do you need improvement? Which areas are your strengths?

(Try taking this assessment again in the future—you may be surprised by how much your answers will change!)

end self assessment content

1.1 The Value of College

You’re in college for lots of reasons that you are expecting will benefit you both now and in the future. The College Board (2015) details that a college education “unlocks opportunities” and helps you “become more independent.” The opportunities that result from a college education include the ability to get a job—one that will likely offer higher pay and include more influence, as well as more decision-making and leadership opportunities, than jobs that only require a high school diploma. And you’ll have more opportunities to keep that job and advance within the workplace than those without a college degree.

“Learning is the only thing the mind never exhausts, never fears, and never regrets.” — Leonardo da Vinci

Figure 1-1 Comparison of Salaries for College versus High School Graduates
These data are for median full-time working Millennials aged 25–32 in 2012.

Graphic showing an income earned of $45,000 with Bachelor's Degree or More, $30,000 earned with 2-year degree or some college; $28,000 earned with high school graduation only.
end figure

College offers many opportunities for you to become independent. You’ll create your own class schedule and get to decide which subjects to explore in more depth, as well as what the focus of your major and career will be. Your nonacademic time is also now under your control, and you’ll get to decide how much time to devote to work, wellness, socializing, and extracurricular activities. The time spent in college becoming more independent will help you build the knowledge, strategies, and habits you’ll need to be a successful, independently functioning adult professional. See Figure 1-2 for more information about how college graduates fare in the workplace. 

Graphic shows that of employed adults that earned a bachelor's degree or more, 86% have a career-track job, 63% have enough training to get ahead in their job, 53% are very satisfied with their current job, and 46% felt their education helped prepare them for their career. These percentages are about 10% less for adults with some college or 2-year degrees, and mostly lower still for those that only have a high school graduation or less.

Figure 1-2 Comparison of Professional Opportunities & Satisfaction Based on Education Level
These graphs show how different levels of education compare and make a strong case for completing college.

end figure
Reflection Question 1-1

What are your reasons for attending college? What do you expect to get out of this experience? What are you willing to put into it?

CareerConnection.png
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Most major companies want their clients to value their goods and services. Recently, the most successful companies have realized that, in order to really affect the marketplace, they have to create an environment where employees value what they do and the culture in which they do it. As you move through your college experience, think about not only valuing good grades and your degree but also seeking value in the learning processes and academic work itself. 

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HWK MC 1.1-2

Which of the following is NOT an opportunity in college to become independent?

A

Deciding how much time to dedicate to activities

B

Choosing a career focus

C

Managing your class schedule

D

Avoiding supplemental instruction


1.2 Beginning Your Journey

Starting anything new can be exciting and fun as well as challenging, scary, anxiety-provoking, and stressful. Starting college will be no different. If you are heading to college straight after high school, you will find yourself with new freedom alongside new responsibilities. If you are a nontraditional student, you will find yourself facing new challenges alongside your exciting responsibilities. Either way, to be successful, you will need to consciously navigate this important transition. 

1.2a The Transition to College

The transition to college is a big one, and you may be feeling a number of competing emotions. The campus is likely larger than your high school and unfamiliar, you may be living on your own, your social support network has been disrupted, and you are taking college-level courses. If you are a nontraditional student, you may be wondering how you’re going to juggle your coursework with your work and family responsibilities.

Schreiner (2012) describes five hallmarks of a successful transition. They are:

  1. Perceiving the transition positively as an opportunity for growth
  2. Using healthy coping skills rather than avoiding the transition
  3. Recognizing where support can be found
  4. Accessing the available resources for information, assistance, and support
  5. Emerging from the transition having grown significantly as a person

Your campus likely recognizes the importance of a smooth transition for you and has structured your transition experience to support each of the five hallmarks of a successful transition. Offering the course that required this book is one way that your college or university has recognized the importance of providing you with the support (#3) and resources (#4) that you need to grow (#1). Further, this course will help you reflect on opportunities to develop strategies and abilities that will help you be successful in college and beyond (#1) and will directly teach you healthy coping strategies for both academic and personal success (#2). 


QuickTips.png

Quick Tips For Surviving Your Transition to College
These quick ideas will help you manage your transition to college.

  • Get information. Inform yourself of resources and processes that will lower your stress and anxiety.
  • Ask Questions.
  • Exercise and eat properly. Don’t let stress overtake your healthy habits—that will only cause more stress down the road.
  • Keep your eyes on the prize by reminding yourself of the long-range goal. That’s the reason for all of this transition and change.
  • Plan ahead. Taking time to look at the overall schedule will help you manage all of the changes more effectively.
  • Once you have a plan in place, take things one step at a time. Just focus on the priorities and activities of the day.
  • Remember that the transitional phase will pass. Soon you’ll be an expert at living your life as a student.
  • Share your experiences with others. Laugh about your rookie mistakes with your roommate or your friends, and pair up to work through new activities.
  • Pat yourself on the back! Acknowledge your small successes and don’t focus on the hiccups. 
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Your college or university has other systems in place to help you transition such as orientation, advising, and welcome week activities. Your faculty will take time to go over the course expectations and syllabus with you, usually in the first class session of the course. Not only can this help you make the transition into their specific course but it is also helpful in making the transition from high school to college-level coursework. Your residence staff was probably in the parking lot to assist you in unloading your car and getting settled in on move-in day. In all respects, your campus is there to support you. 

Reflection Question 1-2

How has your transition to college been so far? What attitudes, behaviors and activities have made it good or bad? Who has advocated for your success so far? How will you maintain that relationship moving forward?

Graphics shows a variety of numbers applicable to attaining a 4-year degree, from 8 semesters, 40 courses and 120 credits, to 120 Friday nights, 4 spring breaks and 4 winter breaks.

Figure 1-3 College by the Numbers (for a 4-Year Degree)*
* These numbers are applicable to many students completing a 4-year degree, but your individual experience may differ. These numbers are also based on a semester system; if your college uses quarters or another system, these numbers may differ.


end figure
HWK MC 1.2a-1

Which of the following is a hallmark of successful transition?

A

Avoiding negative transitions

B

Managing transition independently

C

Perceiving the transition positively as an opportunity for growth

D

Emerging from the transition unchanged

HWK MC 1.2a-2

A college success course can help you be successful in college and beyond in all EXCEPT which of the following ways?

A

Teaching healthy coping strategies

B

Easing you into college with an easy class

C

Helping you reflect on opportunities

D

Helping you develop new strategies and abilities


1.2b Managing Your Expectations

Any journey should begin with expectations about the sights and activities you will experience. You probably have expectations about academics, friends, parties, sporting events, campus activities, relationships, family, work, extracurricular activities, exercise, dining, and much, much, more. Your college also has expectations for you. They expect you to go to class, study, do your work, and live within the bounds of the student code of conduct. But there will be times when your expectations do not align with your experiences. Here are a few guidelines to ensure you don’t create expectations that will lead to disappointment.

Give Yourself Time
Getting into the pattern of independent living and academic life will take time. Don’t expect everything to go perfectly smoothly from the minute you arrive on campus. Instead, give yourself a few weeks to adjust to your new surroundings, schedule, relationships, and environment. 

“Months are different in college, especially freshman year. Too much happens. Every freshman month equals six regular months—they’re like dog months.”
— Rainbow Rowell

Apply Effort
The familiar saying “You get out of something what you put into it” definitely applies to college. You’ll apply most of your effort and time in college to going to class, studying, homework, papers, and doing well on tests. Be willing to try new strategies, attend new activities, and meet new people.

To get the most out of college, you’ll need to do things that are unfamiliar, and that can be scary. But you will get the most out of your time in college by taking advantage of all of the incredible opportunities on your campus. Remember that your investment in your education included tuition and fees. While tuition goes toward your academic experience, the fees are there to pay for your out-of-class experiences. You’ve paid for these experiences, so why not show up? 

Expect Learning
Having a great college experience doesn’t mean that everything will be exciting and fun. Your college experience isn’t Disneyland®. Rather, expect that every interaction and experience will teach you something. If your baseline expectation is to learn, you’ll be successful every time. You might learn how to take better notes, how to focus during lecture, how to factor polynomials, how to be a better friend, what not to say to your roommate or friends, or which food in the dining hall needs to be avoided. Not all of these lessons will be fun, but if you view each outcome as something that prepares you for the future, you will feel more positive, motivated, and confident in your ability to successfully complete your college journey.

Define What You Want
As you approach each new situation, define what it is you really want. When you go in with vague expectations, it’s easy to be disappointed. For example, if you show up to the first day of class without clear expectations, you might wind up judging the experience against random thoughts and ideas, such as “The instructor is boring” or “The other students seemed more confident than I feel.” If, instead, you go into that first day expecting to get an overview of the course and an understanding of the syllabus and the class policies (such as policies regarding making up missing work or tests), you will likely walk out thinking that the class met your expectations. Being clear ahead of time about what’s realistic and likely will help you manage improbable expectations.

HWK MC 1.2b-1

All EXCEPT which of the following are expectation that your college has for you.

A

Go to class.

B

Have a job.

C

Live within the bounds of the student code of conduct.

D

Study.

HWK MC 1.2b-2

How can you apply your effort to make the most of college?

A

Engage in familiar activities and experiences.

B

Focus all of your time and effort on academics.

C

To maximize productivity, only spend time on things that you are good at.

D

Take advantage of all of the incredible opportunities on your campus.

HWK MC 1.2b-3

If your baseline expectation is to _____, you'll be successful every time.

A

have fun

B

learn

C

get good grades

D

make friends

HWK MC 1.2b-4

Which of the following is a good approach for managing expectations?

A

Apply all your effort toward academics.

B

Visualize your desired outcome.

C

Set high expectations.

D

Define what you want.


1.3 Your Successful Journey

Success in college is actually measured by your university and the higher education community. Your university begins tracking you and your classmates as soon as you start college. They will measure your class GPA, how many of you persist and stay in college each semester, how many end up on academic warning or probation, and eventually, how many of you complete your degrees. Those are all very important measures of college success—but they don’t tell the whole story.

“Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome.”
— Arthur Ashe

In addition to earning your degree, you should be developing knowledge of your major discipline so that you can work within your chosen career after graduation. You will also need to learn a variety of strategies and abilities that will foster professional success. Those strategies include managing your time, health, and emotions, as well as the ability to continue to learn independently through reading, presentations, and group interactions. 

Notice that the focus here is on the completion of your certificate or degree. Your successful journey depends on beginning with the end in mind (Covey 2013). By keeping your long-term goals always in front of you, everyday decisions will be made more mindfully and carefully, and you’ll be less likely to get off track or get involved in habits or situations that become performance barriers

Reflection Question 1-3

How will you measure your success? What indicators matter to you: grades, test scores, course grades, GPA, happiness, relationships, how much you’ve grown in certain areas? Think about how you, personally, will know that your first semester has been successful.


HWK MC 1.3-1

Focusing on the completion of your certificate or degree at the beginning of your college journey is an example of which of the following?

A

Managing your time

B

A performance barrier

C

Beginning with the end in mind

D

Mindfulness


1.3a A Model of Student Success

illustration shows that successful students focus their intentions on being reflective, responsible, healthy, constructive, motivated, strategic and connected.

Figure 1-4 Seven Qualities of Successful Students
During the first few weeks of the transition to college, most students feel very motivated to succeed in their academic journey and spend time and energy connecting to campus activities, organizations, and people. You have probably adopted the constructive mindset that, while some of the tasks you are now responsible for (e.g., navigating campus, standing in line, foraging for food) aren’t necessarily “fun,” they are all helpful for achieving your goals.


end figure

In Learning Strategies for College and Career, we are first going to orient you to our model for student success. It’s based on the idea that, in order to have successful experiences, you need to intentionally act in a manner consistent with qualities that lead to success. The following section will define the components of the model.

Experiences
You will be bombarded with opportunities to participate in classes, talks, student organization meetings, hall meetings, social events, movies, concerts, games, classes, study sessions, tutoring sessions, recitations, laboratories, workouts, and seminars. Each time you participate in something, you have the opportunity to shape the outcome of that experience. By intentionally focusing on the seven qualities of successful students, you will be able to create a more successful outcome for each new experience. Whether it’s taking notes in class or negotiating with your roommate about a new cleaning schedule, every experience you engage in has the potential to have a better outcome if you are intentionally motivated, reflective, strategic, healthy, responsible, constructive, and connected.

Intentionality
To be intentional is to be mindful and purposeful in your actions and thoughts. Being intentional about your student success is to act with the aim of being successful. That means paying attention to your ideas and thoughts and limiting your time and actions to things that are consistent with the successful achievement of your goals. However, being intentional doesn’t mean you can’t have any fun. Rest, relaxation, and participation in work and extracurricular activities are necessary elements of a balanced student. Without balance, you won’t have the ability to concentrate during class and study. Rather, when you are socializing, you should intend to spend your time that way instead of mindlessly being pulled away from studying for a test because you responded to a text about a party.

Being intentional is hard work. It takes willpower and constant awareness of your actions and goals to stay on track. But without this essential element, you can more easily wander off course, participating in experiences that aren’t necessary, distract you from your goals, and limit the time you have to work toward your goals and academic success.

“One’s philosophy is not best expressed in words; it is expressed in the choices one makes … and the choices we make are ultimately our responsibility.”
— Eleanor Roosevelt

Seven Qualities of Successful Students (SQSS)
Now that you’ve committed to intentionally wanting to shape your college experiences to be successful, it is time to examine some of the qualities that will enable you to do that. These qualities should be applied to all of your college experiences, inside and outside of the classroom, and will help you academically and personally, both in college and beyond.

Successful college students are:

  1. Motivated. Successful students have confidence in own abilities, believe that applying effort will produce growth, are goal oriented, can motivate themselves, and are committed to lifelong learning.
  2. Reflective. Successful students are metacognitive during learning— meaning that they monitor their own focus and understanding of course material. They evaluate their own performance and take corrective action accordingly. They are aware of their own strengths and weaknesses and select strategies based on those self-perceptions.
  3. Strategic. Successful students plan which processes and strategies they will use to learn, and they are in control of their attention and focus. They also change strategies according to goals and task requirements, seek help, and manage their time and resources.
  4. Healthy. Successful students focus on their psychosocial well-being, which includes managing their emotions, stress, finances, and health. In particular, managing health includes nutrition, exercise, sleep, avoiding unhealthy drug and alcohol use, and practicing safe sex. A focus on well-being also includes the goal of being happy and satisfied personally, academically, and professionally.
  5. Responsible. Successful students take responsibility for, and control of, their own academic and personal success. They take ownership of problems and failures alongside successes and take help-seeking actions when necessary. They are proactive and forward in their thinking and planning.
  6. Constructive. Successful students have a productive approach to new situations and a desire to make gains and improvements in their personal and academic lives. They are committed to lifelong learning and are able to validate their own self-worth. Being constructive includes having the desire to find meaning in all experiences and being resilient in the face of criticism and failure.
  7. Connected. Successful students are linked to the community around them. They foster healthy relationships with those around them and are interdependent on those relationships for social, personal, and academic support. Connected students participate in the life of the community, attending events and engaging in community service.

 

Reflection Question 1-4

Do you have a personal model for living or success that you follow? What parts of our model do you find most personally relevant?

Applying the Model
It is one thing to read about and understand a model for success. It is another thing to apply it. Using time management strategies as an example, the seven qualities of successful students can be applied like this:

  1. A successful student is motivated to spend the necessary time and effort on academic pursuits. There’s an essential connection between motivation and time management.
  2. A successful student reflects on how distractions can negatively affect her or his learning. Distractions can get even the best time manager off track, so being mindful of how much time you need to complete activities and staying focused while you’re doing them is essential for success.
  3. A successful student is strategic in her or his approach to managing time. This includes using semester planners, weekly schedules, and to-do lists—to name just a few great strategies for managing your most precious resource.
  4. A successful student remembers that being healthy is an important aspect of your college experience. Eating right, exercising, and managing sleep routines and money all require time and are an important part of any student’s schedule.
  5. A successful student is responsible for her or his own time. College students are expected to independently manage their schedules. It’s up to you to show up to class on time, to give yourself enough time to study and complete assignments, and to manage the activities you choose to engage in when you’re not in class.
  6. A successful student is constructive in her or his approach to time management. She or he recognizes that a well-managed schedule optimizes the time spent on goals and helps one maintain a positive focus on success. Being constructive, in this context, also includes valuing the time you are spending on your goals because it will lead to personal growth and goal attainment. When you’re not constructive in how you think about your time, you might wind up resenting the time you must spend studying or taking care of yourself.
  7. A successful student stays connected to what’s going on around her or him while remembering that in college, you will likely have more events, activities, and plans to juggle than you did before. It’s important to realize that the more connected you are, the better your time management needs to be. 
Career Connection
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In college, we are hoping you will follow the student success model described in this book. When you are hired for your first job (if you haven’t been already), you may need to adapt to a new model that leads to the company’s success. Look at the success models used by Zappos, Amazon, or W. L. Gore. How do these businesses run? What makes them successful? Adopting a model for success that guides your thoughts and behaviors in college is excellent training for your future career. 

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HWK MC 1.3a-2

In order to make the most of college, what should you keep in mind about your experiences?

A

You can shape the outcome.

B

You can ignore the outcome if it is unpleasant.

C

You can share the outcome if you are proud of it.

D

You can provide constructive feedback to improve the experience for others in the future.

HWK MC 1.3a-3

Which of the following is synonymous with intentional?

A

Effortful

B

Purposeful

C

Responsible

D

Exciting

HWK MC 1.3a-5

Students are more likely to be successful if they do which of the following?

A

Intentionally recognize which qualities are important to a particular experience.

B

Intentionally ignore those qualities that aren't important to a particular experience.

C

Strategically avoid experiences that are challenging.

D

Apply all seven qualities to all college experience.

HWK MC 1.3a-6

Which of the following describes the connection between motivation and time management?

A

A successful student makes sure that they have enough time that they don't need to be motivated.

B

A successful student is motivated to spend the necessary time and effort on academic pursuits.

C

A successful student increases their motivation by procrastinating until they are closer to the deadline.

D

A successful student doesn't need to manage their time because they are naturally motivated by their interest in academics.


1.4 What Lies Ahead: an Overview

Learning Strategies for College and Career contains ideas that you will use in college and beyond. Each chapter focuses on a key experience you’ll be engaging in each semester that, done well, can facilitate your academic and personal success. The chapters focus on the following experiences in college:

Chapter 2 Motivation & Goals
This chapter focuses on how to manage your motivation and ways to use it to increase your energy and effort as you engage in your coursework and life outside of class.

Chapter 3 Taking Charge of Your Time
Here we look at the strategies you need to manage your long-term goals as well as your semester, weekly, and daily schedules.

Chapter 4 Help-Seeking Behavior & Campus Resources
In this chapter, we profile the resources on campus that are essential for your academic and personal success.

Chapter 5 Strategic Self-Management
This chapter unpacks different ideas for understanding and managing your emotions and stress in college. You will learn how to build your capacity to act constructively, identify the issues that push your stress buttons, and build your resistance to stress.

Chapter 6 Connecting College to Career
The focus of this chapter is how to make direct connections between the strategies you are learning in college and success in your future career.

Chapter 7 Student Engagement: The Context of College, Courses, & Studying
The aim of this chapter is to help you understand the general environment of college, its policies and guidelines, college courses, and how you organize yourself for individual and group study.

Chapter 8 Thinking & Remembering
This chapter describes the different types of thinking that will enable you to be successful in college and beyond, as well as the basic characteristics of memory and effective learning strategies for improving your memory.

Chapter 9 Listening Skills for Classroom & Conversation
Here we focus on listening skills that will help you be successful in both academic and interpersonal communication settings.

Chapter 10 Taking Notes
In this chapter, we showcase a variety of models and strategies for taking good notes in class, from texts, and online.

Chapter 11 Getting Involved with Your Reading
This chapter will provide you with strategies that can help you become more effective and efficient at extracting the information you need from readings as well as understanding more of what you’re reading.

Chapter 12 Assessment & Test Taking
The final chapter is designed to help you understand the larger context of evaluation as feedback and provides concrete suggestions for improving your test-taking skills.   

1.5 Connect to Campus

This chapter was intended to set you up for success in college by making you mindful of the values and qualities that will lead to success not just in college but in life. To this end, the chapter provided a model for student success built around seven key qualities of successful students. An important part of the model is your ability to be “connected” in your experience. With this in mind, each chapter will end with a section that connects the particular experience covered by the chapter with key resources available on your campus that can facilitate success in that area.

This chapter focused on your transition and overall success. Your campus has a variety of resources to help you with both of these key issues. While the terminology and specifics will vary from place to place, the below represent features common to most college campuses.

  • Student Life. The office of student life supports student development from a holistic perspective. They provide support for student organizations to help you get involved in activities outside of class. They also support the whole community by creating a safe environment that accounts for everyone’s diverse needs. During welcome week, they likely have one or more fairs or events that provide you with opportunities to sample all of the activities and organizations that you can join.
  • Advisors, Coaches, and Mentors. Advisors, coaches, and mentors are specifically trained to understand how overwhelming the transition to college can be and which academic and personal resources you might need to support you. If you are invited to participate in a mentoring program, be sure to try it out. You can always phase out of mentoring after your adjustment to college is complete.
  • Faculty. Your faculty support your transition to college-level coursework by explaining their expectations on the first day of class and holding weekly office or consultation hours so that you can get individual help. If you’re having difficulty understanding how to be successful in any course, go to office hours right away. Come prepared with specific questions to guide the conversation towards your particular needs.
  • Supplemental Instruction. Supplemental instruction (SI) is offered in courses that traditionally have a high rate of student difficulty. You may see SI sessions listed in the schedule of classes, on your syllabus, or they may be announced on the first day of class. There is a considerable amount of research on the SI model that demonstrates that students who attend SI are more academically successful than students who don’t (Dawson, van der Meer, Skalicky, and Cowley 2014). SI is usually led by a peer student who has already been successful in that specific class. What better way to get the inside scoop on academic success than from a student role model who has been there before? Don’t wait until you are already in trouble to go to SI. Remember, it’s offered in courses than are known to be challenging. Take you cue from that and go preventatively.
  • Residence Hall Assistants (RA) and Directors (RHD). These peers and professionals are also specifically trained to assist students in the transition to college. Their particular focus is on your new living environment and relationship with your roommate(s). They can help you with making sure your room feels homey and that you and your roommate are getting off to a good start, as well as with getting involved on campus and within your hall community.

1.6 Connecting Student Success to Your Career

Today’s Millennial college students expect to stay in a job for less than 3 years (Meister 2012). This new trend, sometimes called “job hopping,” occurs when a professional changes jobs frequently to improve salary, gain skills, or take on more responsibility and leadership positions. Each time you hop from job to job, you will be taking on the challenge of a new transition. Like your transition to college, a successful job transition will need to be viewed positively—as an opportunity for growth. You will need to use proactive, healthy coping skills, know your support systems during the change, gather all pertinent information, and use both old and new resources. After the transition, you should take time to reflect on how you’ve grown. Your ability to transition to college as a first-year student, and during your future semester-by-semester transitions, will provide you with foundational skills for transitioning within or between different places of work. 

Closing Comments

“Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.”
— Dr. Seuss

You’ve just completed your first few days or weeks of college. We hope you were able to use the information in this chapter about successful transitions as a guide to managing your own set of “firsts” as you embarked on this journey. As you continue to move forward, the student success model and the principle of being motivated, reflective, strategic, healthy, responsible, constructive, and connected should enable you to negotiate your way through your first semester and beyond. We are excited to be with you through the experience of this book and as you complete this course. We feel privileged to be one of the resources you’re going to connect with and look forward to being a part of your success in college.  

Paul's Note

When I began college, I did not realize how important it is to regard transition as a process and a skill to build. My transition to college really ended when I exchanged many inappropriate habits and attitudes from high school (which contributed to low grades) for new productive behaviors that I had practiced during my sophomore year.

Subsequent transitions also required changing from one set of beliefs or behaviors to those appropriate for the new environment. Within a 10-year period, I transitioned from college to graduate school, from graduate school to the army, from single to married, from army life back to graduate school, to parenthood, to family deaths, and to two new jobs. Transition expert William Bridges is correct in observing that transition begins with an ending (of old beliefs and behaviors) and ends with a new beginning (of new beliefs and behaviors). Successful transitions involve lifelong skill building and are growth-producing experiences.

Rebecca's Note

I was raised in a military family, so we moved frequently. I think this helped me build skills in making transitions from place to place more easily. I viewed my first semester of college as just another location shift where I had to learn what was where and who was who.

I started my first year of college as a commuter student at New Mexico State University in my hometown of Las Cruces—the very thing I was determined not to do. To make it feel more like I had gone away to college, rather than staying home, I pledged a sorority, studied in the library until late every night, and attempted to abandoned all of my high school friends who were also attending NMSU.

The campus was big enough that I was able to branch out independently and pretend that I was living away from home, but I was also still benefitting greatly from my family’s support during that first year. My parents really helped to ease my transition by letting me come and go as needed. I lived out of the family kitchen as if it were my own apartment (except that they didn’t charge me for the groceries!).

But, despite my best attempts to abandon my friends, the campus was also small enough that I ran into them often. These quick catch-up sessions between classes meant that I knew they were there if I needed them and I still felt those close connections. Overall, my transition was fairly smooth because my frequent moves as a child had helped me learn how to quickly adapt to change. 

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Extend Your Experience 

What, So What, and Now What?

Chapter 1 - What

What are the hallmarks of a successful transition? What is the student success model?

Chapter 1 - So What

So what is the value of adopting the student success model for you, personally?

Chapter 1 - Now What

Now what will you do to use the student success model?


SQSS Reflection

Chapter 1 - SQSS Reflection

How are intentionality and experiences tied to the seven qualities of successful students?


Your Campus Quiz

Campus Quiz 1-1

Where on your campus can you go to get general assistance with issues like your transition to college, homesickness, and your overall success?

Campus Quiz 1-2

What information do you need to prepare for a visit to the place(s) you listed above?

Campus Quiz 1-3

What might hinder your help-seeking behavior and prevent you from getting support? How can you get past this barrier?


Case Study

Craig is a first-year student who has moved into the residence hall and is sharing a room for the first time. He arrived on the first day of move-in so he would have time to unpack and attend all of the welcome week activities. He attended all of the concerts and the hypnotist show and then went to after parties, staying out until 2 or 3 a.m. every night.

The first day of classes, he rolled out of bed after hitting the snooze button several times and barely made it to class on time. He was sleepy during all of his classes that morning. He took a few notes, but pretty much just stuffed his syllabi into his backpack to look at later. For the next several weeks, he kept going to late-night parties but never missed a class.

Craig thought his first few weeks of college were going great. After all, his social life was amazing and he was attending all of his classes! Therefore, he was surprised to learn at midterm that he was failing almost all of his classes and had missed several deadlines and assignments. Now he plans to cut back on a couple nights a week of partying and get his grades up to A’s by the end of final exams. 

Case Study 1-1

Describe a better way for Craig to have managed his transition to college.

Case Study 1-2

Are Craig’s plans to cut back on partying and get all A’s by the end of the semester realistic? Why or why not?

Case Study 1-3

What campus resources should Craig access immediately that might help get the situation on track? What is a better action plan than the one he’s decided on?

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Projects

Project 1-1: Managing Your Transition

Refer back to the hallmarks of a successful transition in this chapter (section 1.2a) and consider two new transition experiences you have just completed: (1) Starting a new class, and (2) living with a roommate/being a commuter student.

Answer the questions for both transitions below. 

This project is also available as a downloadable PDF or Excel sheet. Please see the downloadable files titled "Chapter 1 Project 1-1 PDF and Chapter 1 Project 1-1 Excel in the folder titled "Projects: Your College Journey".

What are the opportunities to grow in these two situations?

Project 1-1 Question 1a

Starting a new class

Project 1-1 Question 1b

Living with a roommate or being a commuter student

What healthy coping skills would help you ease transitioning into this new situation? What aspects of the new situation would you be tempted to avoid? What can you do now to make sure you don't fall into avoidance behaviors?

Project 1-1 Question 2a

Starting a new class

Project 1-1 Question 2b

Living with a roommate or being a commuter student

What support systems and resources are in place to help you with these transitions?

Project 1-1 Question 3a

Starting a new class

Project 1-1 Question 3b

Living with a roommate or being a commuter student

What would prevent you from asking for help? If you do ask for help, what information do you need or what steps do you need to take to prepare to receive help?

Project 1-1 Question 4a

Starting a new class

Project 1-1 Question 4b

Living with a roommate or being a commuter student

How will you know that you've grown or benefited from the situation? What indicators will you look for?

Project 1-1 Question 5a

Starting a new class

Project 1-1 Question 5b

Living with a roommate or being a commuter student


Project 1-2: Applying the Student Success Model

1. Think about your overall class schedule and identify the class that you are least interested in or most worried about in terms of your success (or both).

2. Think about each of the seven qualities of successful students and apply them to this challenging course by answering the questions for each.

This project is also available as a downloadable PDF. Please see the downloadable file titled "Chapter 1 Project 1-2 PDF in the folder titled "Projects: Your College Journey".

Motivated

Project 1-2 Question 1a

How will you motivate yourself to study?

Project 1-2 Question 1b

What is your grade goal for this course?

Reflective

Project 1-2 Question 2a

When studying for this course, how do you plan to test yourself to make sure you know the material?

Project 1-2 Question 2b

What strengths do you have for this course? What are your weaknesses? (e.g., reading, notes, memorization, etc.)

Strategic

Project 1-2 Question 3a

What are the top three strategies you'll need to succeed for this course (e.g., reading, note-taking, memorization, active listening, writing, public speaking, time management, etc.)

Healthy

Project 1-2 Question 4a

You've identified that this course is likely to be challenging for you. What's the best way to manage your stress during this challenging course?

Project 1-2 Question 4b

Are you an emotional eater (either snacking while anxious or becoming so overwhelmed that you skip meals)? What situations during this course might trigger unhealthy eating patterns?

Responsible

Project 1-2 Question 5a

What parts of this course are you in control over? How will you maximize your potential for the parts you can control?

Constructive

Project 1-2 Question 6a

If you're not interested in the subject matter of this course, what skills can you develop that you are interested in learning how to do better (e.g., listening, note-taking, test taking, reading, critical thinking)?

Project 1-2 Question 6b

What other positives will result from your successful completion of the course?

Connected

Project 1-2 Question 7a

What resources exist to support your academic success in this course? Look to see if tutoring, supplemental instruction, or recitations are available.

Project 1-2 Question 7b

Will your instructor be holding review or other help sessions? When are office hours?

In Summary

Project 1-2 Question 8

Look back at your answers. Which of the seven qualities changed your perspective the most? How did your perspective change?



Beginning with the end in mind
A problem-solving technique where the individual starts by thinking about the outcome and goal and then works backward to determine steps for how to get there
Performance barrier
An obstacle or issue that gets in the way of your ability to succeed as a student