Introducing Public Policy
Introducing Public Policy

Introducing Public Policy

Source: Saylor

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A question pack on public policy process from Saylor Academy.

This content is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Introducing Public Policy Q1

According to C. Wright Mills and Floyd Hunter’s power elite theory, what is the general outcome of the policy process in the United States?

A

Public policies distribute policy widely but unequally.

B

Policies are established that reflect the interests of the elite rather than the demands of the masses.

C

Public policies reflect the will of the people because of elections.

D

Public policy is the result of competition among interest groups, and this competition is so persistent that no one group can persist for a long period of time and exert disproportionate influence on policy.

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q2

According to Dr. Catherine Smith, what is “the logical first move in a policy process”?

A

Marshaling public support

B

Formulating policy alternatives

C

Defining the problem

D

Lobbying Congress to take action on an issue

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q3

According to the stages model of the public-policy process, what is the first stage of the policy-making process?

A

Crafting of bills in congressional committees

B

Setting the agenda

C

Having public debate about different policy options to address an issue

D

Analyzing the various costs and benefits of specific policies

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q4

According to thisnation.com, what has been described as “a means toward a host of public and social policy ends”?

A

Congressional action

B

The judicial branch

C

Bureaucracy

D

Public-private partnerships

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q5

According to William D. Coplin and Michael K. O’Leary, what is the purpose of public policy?

A

To justify the role of government in society

B

To solve problems affecting people in society

C

To help citizens prosper and achieve their goals

D

None of the above

E

All of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q6

Based on his arguments in “Federalist 10,” which of the following accurately characterizes James Madison’s (“Publius’s”) feelings with regard to the Constitution?

A

Madison opposed the Constitution as it was written.

B

Madison distrusted a unitary executive.

C

Madison believed that a country with a strong federal government was better to guard against narrow factions than a country dominated by small state governments.

D

Madison favored proportional representation in the legislature.

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q7

In the context of the creation of the United States Constitution, what is the best definition of the word “republican”?

A

A conservative approach to government.

B

A system of government in which each citizen directly votes on each potential policy.

C

More powerful state governments and a weak federal government.

D

A system of government in which citizens are represented by elected officials.

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q8

In “Federalist 51,” Madison (writing as “Publius”) uses the phrase “ambition must be made to counteract ambition.” To which constitutional principle does this refer?

A

The separation of powers among different branches of government

B

The system of elected representation

C

A meritocratic civil service

D

Term limits for elected officials

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q9

In “Federalist 78,” how did Alexander Hamilton (writing as “Publius”) view the role of the judicial branch?

A

It was the branch of government least dangerous to individual rights.

B

It would bring judgment and discretion to government.

C

It would prevent intrusion on the rights of minorities.

D

Its independence would be best preserved by permanent tenure for justices.

E

All of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q10

James Madison (writing under the name “Publius”) addresses what issue in “Federalist 10”?

A

The importance of the unitary executive with regard to policy implementation by administrative agencies.

B

The challenges to governing and policy-making presented by political parties (“the mischiefs of faction”).

C

The importance of a formalized, meritocratic bureaucracy to implement policies.

D

The role of a bicameral legislature in fairly creating public policies.

E

All of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q11

The public-policy process includes which of the following?

A

Choosing which problems to solve

B

Deciding on and between solutions

C

Deciding what is and is not a problem

D

All of the above

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q12

The U.S. Postal Service, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, AMTRAK, and the FDIC are all examples of what?

A

Government corporations

B

Independent government agencies

C

Public-private partnerships

D

Nonbureaucratic government organizations

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q13

What issues are captured by the term “market failure”?

A

Prices are decoupled with supply and demand.

B

A public good (for example, infrastructure) is under-provided.

C

Commons are misused.

D

All of the above

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q14

Which contemporary aspect of governance in the United States did the Federalists fail to anticipate?

A

The growth of the governmental agenda

B

The development of the modern administrative state

C

Rapid developments in technology

D

Globalization

E

All of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q15

Which of the following is a key feature of federalist design?

A

The design of government does not rest on one feature, but on a relationship among a group of principles and actions.

B

Having regular elections to make representatives accountable to diverse interests.

C

Power should be divided between the states and the federal government, as well as among different branches of the federal government.

D

Limits to authority

E

All of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q16

Which of the following is an assumption of pluralism?

A

Consensus is possible.

B

Experts are unbiased.

C

All potential interests have the equal capacity to organize and mobilize.

D

Markets are the best way to provide public goods.

E

Elites are benevolent and unbiased.

Introducing Public Policy Q17

Which of the following is not considered a part of the federal bureaucracy?

A

Government corporations

B

Congressional committees

C

Independent regulatory commissions

D

Independent agencies

E

Executive departments

Introducing Public Policy Q18

Which of the following is one of Kelman’s critiques of the federalist design of government?

A

The path to making policy is too direct and does not provide adequate checks and balances.

B

Federalist institutions are good for protecting against negative liberties, but less good at providing positive liberties.

C

The federalist design erroneously relies on the altruism of elected officials to produce good policy.

D

None of the above

E

All of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q19

Which of the following refers to an individual who does not contribute to or participate in a group, but nonetheless benefits from the existence and activities of the group?

A

Noncitizen

B

Layman

C

Lobbyist

D

Free rider

E

None of the above

Introducing Public Policy Q20

Which of the following statements accurately describes the legislative process in the United States?

A

It is easier to pass a bill than to kill a bill.

B

It can be long, tedious, complicated, and frustrating.

C

It features specialized but overlapping committees that play an important role in the passage of a bill.

D

All of the above

E

None of the above

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