Intelligence Agencies in US National Security
Intelligence Agencies in US National Security

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security

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A question pack on US Intelligence and National Security from Saylor Academy.

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Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q1

What was the most recent declaration of war by Congress?

A

World War II

B

The Vietnam War

C

Operation Iraqi Freedom

D

Operation Enduring Freedom

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q2

When individual members of Congress have sued presidents in federal court, seeking to enjoin or cease military use of force, federal courts have done which of the following?

A

Granted injunctive relief if the actions of the president occurred without a declaration of war

B

Dismissed their claims on the basis of the “political questions doctrine”

C

Ordered trials by jury

D

Dismissed their claims due to a lack of standing

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q3

Which tactic permits a single US Senator to block or delay legislative action by engaging in extended floor debate?

A

Cloture

B

Divestiture

C

Cloaking

D

Filibuster

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q4

Why do many members of Congress have little interest in serving on Intelligence Oversight Committees?

A

They have limited knowledge or experience in the intelligence field.

B

The actions of the committees are most often secret, so there is little “political gain” to be had from the appointment.

C

Many are in states or districts that are only minimally impacted by intelligence operations.

D

All of the above

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q5

Congress can “check” the power of the president in national security by doing all of the following, EXCEPT:

A

Making program funds subject to restrictions on operations.

B

Vetoing an Executive Order.

C

Issuing subpoenas to the president, vice president, and members of their staff.

D

Refusing to ratify treaties.

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q6

According to Clausewitz, war is considered to be which of the following?

A

Hell

B

The result of economic scarcity

C

Best won by winning the hearts and minds of those invaded

D

The use of violence to achieve some purpose

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q7

According to Clausewitz, what is the driving force of war?

A

Violence

B

Policy dictated by politicians

C

Public opinion

D

Money and weapons

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q8

If the army needed satellite imagery of a particular location in order to initiate a military attack, which intelligence agency would be tasked with providing the data?

A

The Central Intelligence Agency

B

The National Security Agency

C

The National Reconnaissance Office

D

The Defense Intelligence Agency

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q9

If the Pentagon were seeking information on the location of weapons of mass destruction in another country, which of the following forms of intelligence would be considered the least reliable?

A

HUMINT

B

COMINT

C

ELINT

D

MASINT

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q10

The Department of Homeland Security is tasked with all of the following, EXCEPT:

A

Manning immigration and border checkpoints.

B

Collecting customs taxes on imported goods.

C

Searching passengers prior to boarding commercial aircraft.

D

Inspecting cruise ships for seaworthiness and passenger safety.

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q11

The fact that the US has not deployed nuclear or atomic bombs against an enemy in combat since World War II can best be explained by which of the following principles?

A

Just cause

B

Proportionality

C

Last resort

D

Public declaration

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q12

USSID 18, as it was originally enacted, prohibited the National Security Agency from collecting intelligence on “American persons.” Which president first amended USSID 18 to allow NSA to collect intelligence on “American persons,” under certain conditions?

A

Richard Nixon

B

Ronald Reagan

C

Bill Clinton

D

George W. Bush

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q13

Which intelligence agency is charged with collecting, analyzing, and reporting on foreign signals intelligence (SIGINT) information?

A

Central Intelligence Agency

B

Defense Intelligence Agency

C

National Reconnaissance Office

D

National Security Agency

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q14

Which writer from Ancient Greece is considered one of the fathers of modern military strategy?

A

Aristotle

B

Plato

C

Thucydides

D

Homer

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q15

The tendency of military commanders to only look at their own operations, rather than the entire battlefield, when engaging in strategic planning is called ______________.

A

Theater-itis

B

Tactical engagement

C

Localization

D

Entrenchment

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q16

A nation’s economic power is generally the result of which of the following?

A

Natural resources

B

Human capital

C

Industrialization

D

All of the above

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q17

Congress can check the power of the National Security Council (NSC) by all of the following means, EXCEPT:

A

Use of the War Powers Act.

B

Reductions or restrictions on funding and appropriation of national security programs.

C

Refusing to confirm presidential appointments of Cabinet members.

D

Vetoing NSC decisions.

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q18

Decision makers can avoid the risks of groupthink by doing which of the following?

A

Limiting the number of participants in the policymaking process

B

Achieving quick consensus on decisions

C

Seeking opposing and contradictory alternatives to proposals

D

All of the above

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q19

The argument that the USSR was defeated in the Cold War due to the arms race with the US is an application of the ______________ theory of strategic policymaking.

A

Attrition

B

Scorched earth

C

Realpolitik

D

Star Wars

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q20

The use of positive incentives and non-coercive means to change the behavior of another country is a diplomatic tactic called ______________.

A

Engagement

B

Tariffs

C

Detente

D

Realpolitik

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q21

If the US State Department wanted to measure the impact of an economic development program implemented in Afghanistan, which of the following statistics would they assess?

A

Increase in per capita income among Afghans

B

Decrease in attacks on Afghan government buildings

C

Increase in attacks on military forces

D

All of the above

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q22

Which of the following is one major weakness in America’s economic power in national security affairs?

A

The politicization of the budget process

B

The reliance on foreign oil

C

The instability of American banks and stock markets

D

All of the above

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q23

Which of the following is the optimal decision making model in the area of national security?

A

Policy Triad Model

B

Rational Actor Model

C

Governmental Politics Model

D

None of the above

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q24

Who is the direct supervisor of the National Security Advisor?

A

President

B

Vice President

C

Secretary of State

D

Secretary of Defense

Intelligence Agencies in US National Security Q25

Which president implemented the Schedule C Personnel program to integrate public service career-personnel into the national security policy process that had previously been exclusive to elected officials and political appointees?

A

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

B

Dwight Eisenhower

C

John F. Kennedy

D

Bill Clinton

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