Writing in Transit
Writing in Transit

Writing in Transit

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Ideal for both first-year composition and interdisciplinary writing courses, Writing in Transit offers a two-tiered approach to multidisciplinary writing. Author Denise Comer presents strategies and instruction for navigating the purposes for writing through writing transfer, which encourages students to reflect on what they learn in one context about writing, and about themselves as learners and writers, and then apply, extend, reject, or otherwise modify this knowledge for other disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary contexts. Writing in Transit teaches students how to build practical bridges between disciplines’ discourse conventions by learning about the research and writing process. Writing in Transit calls students to be reflective in their writing, constantly considering which writing approaches work best for them as individuals and under what writing circumstances. Students learn to ask critical situational writing questions to help transfer their writing knowledge across many contexts.

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Key features in this textbook

Top Hat Textbook Chapters
Fountainhead Press textbooks in the Top Hat Marketplace are built full of embedded videos, interactive timelines, charts, graphs, and video lessons from the authors themselves
Top Hat Textbook Create
Approach writing with a multimodal framework, addressing writing in print, visual, digital, and oral formats
Top Hat Textbook Discussion Features
Provides a compelling range of highly interactive disciplinary-based assignments

Comparison of composition or writing course texts.

Consider adding Fountainhead Press’s Writing in Transit, in the Top Hat platform, to your upcoming course. We’ve put together a textbook comparison to make it easy for you in your upcoming evaluation.

Top Hat and Fountainhead Press

Writing in Transit
Comer

Macmillan

St. Martin’s Guide to Writing
12/e
Axelrod and Cooper

Pearson/Longman

Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum, 13/e
Behrens and Rosen

Pearson

A Sequence for Academic Writing
6/e
Behrens and Rosen

Pricing

Average price of textbook across most common format

Up to 40-60% more affordable

Accessible on any device for lifetime access

$70

eText

$107

Hard copy

$59

eText

$108

Hard copy

$83

eText combined with MyWritingLab

$77

Hard copy

Always up-to-date content

Content meets standard for first and second year composition courses. Constantly revised and updated by a community of professors with the latest content.

In-Book Interactivity

Includes embedded multi-media files and integrated software to enhance visual presentation of concepts directly in textbook.

Available only with supplementary resources at additional cost

Available only with supplementary resources at additional cost

Available only with supplementary resources at additional cost

Customizable

Ability to revise, adjust and adapt content to meet needs of course and instructor

Built-In Interactive Assessment Questions

Assessment questions with feedback embedded throughout textbook

All-in-one Platform

Access to additional questions, test banks, and slides available within one platform

Pricing

Average price of textbook across most common format

Top Hat and Fountainhead Press

Writing in Transit

Up to 40-60% more affordable

Accessible on any device for lifetime access

Macmillan

St. Martin’s Guide to Writing
12/e

$70

eText

$107

Hard copy

Pearson/Longman

Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum
13/e

$59

eText

$108

Hard copy

Pearson

A Sequence for Academic Writing
6/e

$83

eText combined with MyWriting Lab

$77

Hard copy

Always up-to-date content

Revised and updated with the latest content

Top Hat and Fountainhead Press

Writing in Transit

Macmillan

St. Martin’s Guide to Writing
12/e

Pearson/Longman

Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum
13/eC

Pearson

A Sequence for Academic Writing
6/e

In-book Interactivity

Includes embedded multi-media files and integrated software to enhance visual presentation of concepts directly in textbook

Top Hat and Fountainhead Press

Writing in Transit

Macmillan

St. Martin’s Guide to Writing
12/e

Available only with supplementary resources at additional cost

Pearson/Longman

Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum
13/e

Available only with supplementary resources at additional cost

Pearson

A Sequence for Academic Writing
6/e

Available only with supplementary resources at additional cost

Customizable

Ability to revise, adjust and adapt content to meet needs of course and instructor

Top Hat and Fountainhead Press

Writing in Transit

Macmillan

St. Martin’s Guide to Writing
12/e

Pearson/Longman

Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum
13/e

Pearson

A Sequence for Academic Writing
6/e

Built-in Interactive Assessment Questions

Assessment questions with feedback embedded throughout textbook

Top Hat and Fountainhead Press

Writing in Transit

Macmillan

St. Martin’s Guide to Writing
12/e

Pearson/Longman

Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum
13/e

Pearson

A Sequence for Academic Writing
6/e

All-in-one Platform

Access to additional questions, test banks, and slides available within one platform

Top Hat and Fountainhead Press

Writing in Transit

Macmillan

St. Martin’s Guide to Writing
12/e

Pearson/Longman

Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum
13/e

Pearson

A Sequence for Academic Writing
6/e

About this textbook

Textbook Details

This textbook is aimed at undergraduate composition courses, particularly two-semester writing courses. Writing in Transit is specifically designed to promote a transfer-based approach.

Within the Top Hat platform, Writing in Transit allows for writing and reflecting as the student moves through the interactive text. Multidisciplinary examples highlight how different scholars pose meaningful questions about the same subject material.

Lead Author

Denise ComerDuke University

Denise Comer, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Writing Studies and Director of First-Year Writing at Duke University, has worked with multidisciplinary first-year writing faculty for more than fifteen years. Denise’s scholarship explores writing transfer with the multidisciplinary inquiries into writing pedagogy, writing program administration, and the intersections between technology and the teaching of writing. Her book, It’s Just a Dissertation: Transforming Your Dissertation from Daunting to Doable to Done, co-written with Barbara Gina Garrett (Fountainhead Press, 2014), provides guidance to graduate students across disciplines on how to write and complete a dissertation.

Her articles, attentive to multidisciplinary perspectives and often grounded on a transfer-based approach, have appeared in such journals as Writing across the Curriculum, Teaching/Writing, Pedagogy, and WPA: Writing Program Administration. She has also given presentations about, offered keynote addresses on, and worked as a consultant on multidisciplinary writing pedagogy and writing transfer.

Explore this textbook

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Table of Contents  

Preface to Instructors

Archaeoastronomy and Writing Transfer
Writing Transfer
Whom Writing in Transit is for
Transfer-Based Features of Writing in Transit
Why You Should Introduce Students to Writing in Transit
Your Integral Role with Writing in Transit

About the Author

Chapter 1: Writing Transfer

Pinpointing Chapter 1
What is Writing Transfer?
The Dynamic Nature of Discourse Conventions
A Transfer-Based Approach to Writing
Writing Practices that Align, Modify, and Differentiate across Contexts
Strategies for Becoming Better at Writing Transfer
Why Writing Transfer Matters
Transferring Writing Knowledge, Practices, and Approaches

Chapter 2: Research and Writing as a Process

Pinpointing Chapter 2
Overview of the Research and Writing Process
Research across Disciplines
Pre-Writing Strategies across Disciplines
Drafting across Disciplines
Revising across Disciplines
Editing across Disciplines
Feedback across Disciplines
Transfer and The Final Product
Transferring the Research and Writing Process

Chapter 3: Posing Meaningful Questions

Pinpointing Chapter 3
Disciplinarity and Questions
Writers Posing Questions: Examples from across Disciplines

  • Example 1: Disciplinary Questions, Chemistry
  • Example 2: Disciplinary Questions, Art History
  • Example 3: Disciplinary Questions, Literature
  • Example 4: Disciplinary Questions, Archaeology

Characteristics of Effective Questions
Strategies for Posing Meaningful Questions
Transferring Questions

Chapter 4: Reading

Pinpointing Chapter 4
Choosing What to Read: Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Reading Materials
Deciding How to Locate Reading Materials
Deciding How to Read: Shallow and In-Depth Reading Strategies
Invoking Discipline-Specific Reading Skills
Transferring Reading

Chapter 5: Summary

Pinpointing Chapter 5
Correcting Common Myths about Summary
Prerequisites for Writing Summary
Varied Components of Summary across Context
Criteria for Effective Summaries across Contexts
Different Occasions for Summary
Summary in Reviews

  • Example 1: Popular Review, Nonfiction Book
  • Example 2.a: Popular Review, Long Form, Documentary Television Series
  • Example 2.b: Popular Review, Short Form, Documentary Television Series
  • Example 3: Academic Review, Book, Library Science
  • Example 4: Academic Review, Book, Environmental Studies

Summary as Abstracts

  • Example: Abstract, Medicine and Biology

Summary as Bibliographic Annotation

  • Example 1: Annotated Bibliography, History
  • Example 2: Library Catalog, Information Science

Executive Summary

  • Example: Public Policy

Summary in Introductions

  • Example: Tourism

Summary in Conclusions

  • Example: Women’s Studies/Education

Summary as Narrative: Lives and Events
Summary in Biography

  • Example: History

Summary of Events

  • Example 1: Historical
  • Example 2: Current

Transferring Summary

Chapter 6: Synthesis

Pinpointing Chapter 6
What is Synthesis?
Purposes of Synthesis
Questions that Shape Synthesis
Criteria for Effective Synthesis
Modes of Synthesis across Disciplines
Synthesis as Literature Review

  • Example 1: Extending Others’ Research, Nursing
  • Example 2: Demonstrating a Gap in Prior Research, Business
  • Example 3: Debates in the Field, Sociology

Synthesis of Application

  • Example: Music

Synthesis as Interdisciplinarity

  • Example: African and African-American Studies/Linguistics

Synthesis as Curation of Collections

  • Example 1: Blogs and Websites, African and African-American Studies
  • Example 2: Anthologies, Communication Studies and African and African-American Studies
  • Example 3: Exhibits and Archives, Musicology

Synthesis of Sources as Evidence

  • Example: History

Synthesis as Comparison

  • Example: Cultural Studies

Synthesis as Definition

  • Example: History

Synthesis in Bibliographic Essays

  • Example: Library Science

Transferring Synthesis

Chapter 7: Analysis

Pinpointing Chapter 7
What is Analysis?
The Purposes of Analysis
Types of Data Academic Writers Analyze
Questions that Shape Analysis
Criteria for Effective Analysis
Modes of Analysis
Rhetorical Analysis

  • Example 1: Rhetoric
  • Example 2: Composition and English

Critical Discourse Analysis

  • Example: Literature

Content Analysis

  • Example: Sociology

Visual Analysis

  • Example, English Literature

Scientific Data Analysis

  • Example: Biology

Statistical Analysis

  • Example: Epidemiology

Big Data Analysis

  • Example: Engineering and Computer Science

Transferring Analysis

Chapter 8: Framing Arguments

Pinpointing Chapter 8
Correcting Common Myths about Arguments
What is Argument?
Purposes of Argument
Featured Purposes of Argument
Causal Argument

  • Example 1: Spanish Language and Literature
  • Example 2: Marine Biology

Proposal Argument

  • Example: Management Science

Definitional Argument

  • Example: Sexuality Studies/Latino Studies

Criteria for Effective Argument
Featured Criteria for Effective Argument: Avoiding Logical Fallacies
Transferring Argument Frames

Chapter 9: Constructing Arguments

Pinpointing Chapter 9
Questions that Shape Arguments
Inductive and Deductive Reasoning
Argument Structure
Stasis Theory
Classical Argument Structure

  • Example: Psychology and Biology

Toulmin Argument Structure

  • Example: English Literature

Rogerian Argument Structure

  • Example: Public Policy

Transferring Argument Construction

Chapter 10: Designing Arguments: Formats and Modalities

Pinpointing Chapter 10
Written Modalities of Argument: Scholarly, Public Scholarship, Popular Scholarship
Visual Arguments: Thinking Visually
Common Forms of Visual Arguments across Disciplines
Photographic essays

  • Example: Documentary Studies

Graphics

  • Example 1: Creative Writing
  • Example 2: Chemistry

Academic Posters

  • Example: Mechanical Engineering

Presentation Software

  • Example: Education

Verbal Arguments
Common Forms of Verbal Arguments across Disciplines
Other Modalities for Argument
Transferring Argument Design

Chapter 11: Choosing and Integrating Evidence: Quotes, Paraphrases, Visual Materials, and Data

Pinpointing Chapter 11
What is Evidence?
Purposes for Integrating Evidence
Questions that Shape Integration of Evidence
Criteria for Effectively Integrating Evidence
Featured Strategy for Integrating Evidence: The MEAL Plan
Examples of Integrating Evidence

  • Example 1: History
  • Example 2: Biology
  • Example 3: International Development
  • Example 4: Engineering
  • Example 5: Literature/Women’s Studies
  • Example 6: Sustainability, Environmental Research Organization
  • Example 7: Anthropology

Transferring Evidence

Chapter 12: Citing Resources

Pinpointing Chapter 12
What is Citation?

  • Document Format
  • Bibliographic Citations
  • In-Text Citations

Purposes for Citation
Citation Guides
Questions that Shape Citation
Criteria for Effective Citation
Examples of Citation across Disciplinary Perspectives

  • Example 1: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Physics
  • Example 2: American Psychological Association (APA), Information Science
  • Example 3: Modern Language Association (MLA), English Literature
  • Example 4: Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), History of Science
  • Example 5: American Chemical Society (ACS), Chemistry
  • Example 6: American Anthropological Association (AAA), Archaeology
  • Example 7: American Sociological Association (ASA), Sociology
  • Example 8: Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), with Digital Resources, Art
  • Example 9: Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), with Images, Art

Citation Practices in the Twenty-First Century: Digital and Visual Formats and Materials
Citation of Digital Materials
Citation when Publishing Online
Citing Your Own Work
Crafting Acknowledgments
Transferring Citation

Moving Forward with Writing Transfer

References

Acknowledgments